Adult Psychoanalysis

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Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Training

Adult Psychoanalytic Training
Personal and Educational Requirements For Training
Educational and Clinical Requirements of Applicants
Applicants who are not automatically eligible
Waiver of Eligibility Standards
Application Procedures
Candidate’s Manual
Fee Schedule
Program For Clinical Psychoanalytic Training
The Training Analysis
The Didactic Program
Curriculum
The Supervised Practice Of Psychoanalysis
The Psychoanalytic Essay
Progression
Graduation 

The Western New England Institute for Psychoanalysis does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age or physical handicap in the administration of its admission or educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, or any other school-administered program.


Adult Psychoanalytic Training
 

Learning to analyze adult patients entails three essential components.

1.  The personal psychoanalysis, also referred to as training analysis, is the foundation for training in psychoanalysis. The goal of the personal psychoanalysis is essentially that of a therapeutic psychoanalysis with particular attention to the realization by the candidate of his or her optimum potential as a psychoanalyst. It is essential that the candidate develop the capacities for self-observation, self-reflection, and ultimately, ongoing self-analysis which are necessary for the capacity to maintain a basic psychoanalytic stance.

2.  Completion of the Didactic Program occurs over five years of seminars and case conferences, described under the Curriculum, and includes completion of a Psychoanalytic Essay.

3.  Supervised Clinical Practice of Psychoanalysis involves conducting a minimum of three analyses with supervision from a Supervising Analyst of the Institute. One case should be seen through completion. The cases must include at least one male and one female analysand. Supervision during training continues until the candidate becomes competent to function independently as an analyst.

Personal and Educational Requirements for Training

Selection of an applicant for psychoanalytic education and clinical training involves an assessment of suitability, including possession of certain character traits and ethical values necessary to become an effective psychoanalyst. An applicant should present evidence of integrity, honesty, maturity, flexibility, and strength of character. In addition, the applicant should demonstrate a reasonable capacity for self-observation, self-monitoring, and the ability to maintain proper interpersonal and professional boundaries. It is anticipated that candidates will require personal analysis to become more effective as people and as analysts.

 

Educational and Clinical Requirements of Applicants

The selection of an applicant for psychoanalytic education and clinical training is also based on the assessment of eligibility and readiness: prior education, clinical training, clinical experience, aptitude, and potential for psychoanalytic competence. Before undertaking training in clinical psychoanalysis, postgraduate mental health professional education must entail full immersion in a rigorous, organized, didactic curriculum, a portion of which includes psychodynamic seminars, all of which is accompanied by an organized and supervised clinical training experience.

Applicants with certain educational and training credentials are automatically eligible to apply for admission.  

These include:

1. Doctors of Medicine or Osteopathic Medicine who have graduated from an accredited medical school or osteopathic medical school, are in or have completed A psychiatry residency program, and are licensed by the State of Connecticut in the discipline in which they practice. Psychiatry residency must be completed before Institute graduation.

2. Mental health professionals who have completed a doctoral level degree from an accredited mental health clinical program who are licensed by the State of Connecticut in the discipline in which they practice, or practice in a discipline in which their practices are not regulated by licensure.

3. Mental health professionals who have graduated from an accredited mental health degree program with a clinical master’s degree. This must be a degree generally recognized as the highest clinical degree within the specific mental health profession (masters in social work, in marriage and family therapy, and in psychiatric nursing). These individuals must also have completed at least two additional years beyond their masters degree in didactic and clinical training, including 3,000 hours of clinical experience as well as either (1) 60 hours of psychodynamic psychotherapy supervision and 60 hours of psychodynamic oriented courses and clinical seminars – both of these after receiving the masters degree; or, (2) a two-year organized psychodynamic psychotherapy program including supervised clinical experience – also after receiving the masters degree. They must be licensed in the discipline in which they practice, or practice in a discipline in which their practices are not regulated by licensure.


Applicants who are not automatically eligible

Applicants who do not have automatic eligibility (as above) may receive clinical training if the Institute supports this course and the applicant receives a waiver from the Board on Professional Standards of The American Psychoanalytic Association. The Education Committee has discretionary authority to determine which categories of applicants it will accept for training and is guided by the standards detailed below.


Waiver of Eligibility Standards

The waiver of automatic eligibility is available for individuals who possess the personal qualities and aptitudes for analytic training but do not meet the eligibility requirements above. 

These include:

1. Mental Health Clinicians whose degree is not at the highest level within their profession. The Committee on Preparedness and Progress (COPAP) of the Board on Professional Standards of The American Psychoanalytic Association receives requests for waivers of eligibility requirements for full clinical training from Institutes wishing to train mental health clinicians who, on assessment, appear to be suitable to become psychoanalytic clinicians but do not fully meet the above eligibility criteria.
This includes individuals whose mental health graduate degree is not at the highest educational level generally obtained to practice clinically within their profession (e.g., masters in clinical psychology, in counseling, in education, in pastoral counseling, etc.), but who nevertheless have satisfactorily completed at least two additional years, beyond their masters degree, of didactic and clinical training, including 3,000 hours of clinical experience as well as either (1) 60 hours of psychodynamic psychotherapy supervision and 60 hours of psychodynamically oriented courses and clinical seminars – both of these after receiving the masters degree or, 2) a two-year organized psychodynamic psychotherapy program including supervised clinical experience – also after receiving the masters degree. They must be licensed by the State of Connecticut in the discipline in which they practice, or practice in a discipline in which their practices are not regulated by licensure.

2. Non-Mental Health Clinicians: The Committee on Preparedness and Progress (COPAP) of the Board on Professional Standards of The American Psychoanalytic Association receives requests for waivers of eligibility requirements for full clinical training from non-mental health clinicians who plan to make psychoanalysis their primary career and become psychoanalytic clinicians, but who have not fulfilled all of the eligibility requirements.
This includes: individuals who have satisfactorily completed the degree of Doctor of Medicine or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, but who are not planning to complete a residency training program in psychiatry; individuals who do not possess the highest recognized clinical degree but who are in the later stages of completing the expected educational and clinical prerequisites, such as a medical student or Ph.D. candidate; individuals who are assessed by the Institute to be suitable, but for reasons other than those listed above do not meet all of the formal criteria and are not automatically eligible.

3. Scholars, Researchers, and Administrators: The Committee on Research and Special Training (CORST) of The American Psychoanalytic Association receives applications from Institutes wishing to offer psychoanalytic education and clinical training to scientists, academics, scholars, administrators, and others for whom psychoanalysis is a relevant discipline as an enhancement of their primary field. Applicants may be individuals who have distinguished themselves in their primary field; applicants may also include post-master’s graduate students of unusual potential who have not yet attained the highest degree in their area of specialization. This waver is for full clinical training as a psychoanalyst. The Institute does not offer partial training in psychoanalysis except as detailed in the “
Psychoanalysis for Scholars Program”.